History & Heritage in Dartmoor National Park

Page 8 of 196 Results
Left Lake and Left Lake China Clay Works, Harford, Dartmoor National Park

Left Lake and Left Lake China Clay Works, Harford, Dartmoor National Park

On Dartmoor, a lake is a stream or brook. Left Lake is a very short stream that tumbles from Leftlake Mires down the side of Harford Moor into the River Erme near Piles Valley Weir. The upper section of Left Lake is the site of extensive china clay workings. There's a large, disused pit full of wate...

New Waste, Cornwood, Dartmoor National Park

New Waste, Cornwood, Dartmoor National Park

Whilst you can no longer park at New Waste, it still offers great access to the Stall Moor area of Dartmoor which includes the world's longest stone row in addition to arguably the finest stone row in the National Park near Stalldown Barrow. We've positioned New Waste on Google maps. Zoom in on t...

Ramsley Mine and Ramsley Mine Chimney, South Zeal, Dartmoor National Park

Ramsley Mine and Ramsley Mine Chimney, South Zeal, Dartmoor National Park

Ramsley Mine and Ramsley Mine Chimney rise above South Zeal near the northern border of Dartmoor National Park. They're located on Ramsley Hill and Ramsley Common. Copper was mined here from the 1850s to 1909. A local information board reads 'when the turnpike bypassing [South Zeal] was...

Church House, South Tawton, Dartmoor National Park

Church House, South Tawton, Dartmoor National Park

In the middle of Dartmoor's most famous village, next to the 'Cathedral of the Moor', is the National Trust's Sextons Cottage and Church House. It's a beautiful and popular building. Up by the northern border of the National Park is the even more impressive South Tawton Church House. Ac...

South Tawton St Andrew's Church, South Tawton, Dartmoor National Park

South Tawton St Andrew's Church, South Tawton, Dartmoor National Park

Drive the A30 across the top of Dartmoor from Devon towards Cornwall and you'll see a tall, beautiful church tower against the backdrop of the vast Cosdon Hill. This is South Tawton St Andrew's Church. We've positioned the church on Google maps so zoom in on the 'Satellite' setting to see...

Sheepstor St Leonard Church, Sheepstor, Dartmoor National Park

Sheepstor St Leonard Church, Sheepstor, Dartmoor National Park

According to the Devon Historic Churches Trust, 'there has been a church on this site since the early thirteenth century. The present building dates from the 1450s'. Refer to their site for more information. There's also a more detailed PDF outlining the history of the church on the West Dartmo...

Cut Hill North West Passage Peat Pass and Memorials, Postbridge, Dartmoor National Park

Cut Hill North West Passage Peat Pass and Memorials, Postbridge, Dartmoor National Park

Study Dartmoor's north plateau on the Ordnance Survey Explorer OL28 'Dartmoor' map and you'll see lots of peat passes marked by two thick, black parallel lines. These are paths cut through deep peat that covers the high moorland. On the ground, these peat passes vary quite dramatically. Some, lik...

Dartmeet Stepping Stones, Dartmeet, Dartmoor National Park

Dartmeet Stepping Stones, Dartmeet, Dartmoor National Park

The East Dart River and West Dart River converge at Dartmeet to form the River Dart or Double Dart. At Dartmeet, a bridge spans the East River Dart next to a ruined clapper bridge. To cross the West River Dart here, you need to walk across an arc of stepping stones. Whilst these stepping stones p...

Plym Ford, Princetown, Dartmoor National Park

Plym Ford, Princetown, Dartmoor National Park

There are many fords on the upper section of the River Plym between Plym Head and Ditsworthy Warren House. Some are marked on the Ordnance Survey Explorer OL28 'Dartmoor' map. Others are visible when you walk the river from source to sea. The most used is Plym Ford near Plym Head connecting the high...

Plym Steps, Sheepstor, Dartmoor National Park

Plym Steps, Sheepstor, Dartmoor National Park

'Steps' on Dartmoor usually refer to stepping stones. Stepping stones are often necessary to cross the National Park's many rivers. However, stones are often moved by the power of the water when rivers are in spate. When this happens, the stones can either be repositioned or the set of stepping ston...

Rushford Stepping Stones, Chagford, Dartmoor National Park

Rushford Stepping Stones, Chagford, Dartmoor National Park

The North Teign River and South Teign River meet just west of Chagford to form the River Teign. Chagford Bridge and Rushford Bridge span the water and provide safe crossing points. Downstream of Rushford Bridge, behind Chagford Pool, is an old set of stepping stones. They're uneven and slippery s...

Steps Bridge, Dunsford, Dartmoor National Park

Steps Bridge, Dunsford, Dartmoor National Park

Built at the beginning of the 19th century, Steps Bridge spans the River Teign near the north eastern border of Dartmoor National Park. We've positioned Steps Bridge on Google maps so zoom in on the 'Satellite' setting to see its location. There's a car park just up the hill to the west of t...

Lydford The Norman Castle, Lydford, Dartmoor National Park

Lydford The Norman Castle, Lydford, Dartmoor National Park

An information board on site reads: 'The earthwork is all that remains of a small Norman castle which was probably built in the late 11th century in the years of consolidation after the Norman conquest. It holds a dominant position in the corner of the defended Saxon town. The castle was a 'ri...

Huccaby Stepping Stones/Huccaby Steps, Hexworthy, Dartmoor National Park

Huccaby Stepping Stones/Huccaby Steps, Hexworthy, Dartmoor National Park

If you locate Dartmeet on the Ordnance Survey Explorer OL28 'Dartmoor' map, you'll see a green path crossing the West Dart River running to/from the Combestone Tor area. This is the location of Dartmeet Stepping Stones. Follow the West River Dart upstream as it bows towards Hexworthy and Huccaby and...

Lydford Viking Rune Stone, Lydford, Dartmoor National Park

Lydford Viking Rune Stone, Lydford, Dartmoor National Park

'VIKINGS 997-1997. The stone was raised when the men of the North came again, this time in peace. Erik the Red carved the runes.' The stone is just across the road from the Battle of Lydford Memorial. Both commemorate a battle that took place between invading Vikings and Saxons defending the fortifi...