Whooping Rock, North Bovey, Dartmoor National Park

Whooping Rock, North Bovey, Dartmoor National Park

Explore the moors and coastline of South West England and you'll come across plenty of 'whooping' or 'hooting' rocks. Some are associated with fantastic stories. Our favourite is the 'Hooting Cairn' on The Land's End Peninsula/The Penwith Peninsula of West Cornwall which you can read about in Robert Hunt's 'Popular Romances of the West of England'. Sections of this are available for free via Google Books.

On Dartmoor, there's a 'Whooping Rock' near Easdon Tor on the side of Easdon Down.

In his 'Guide to Dartmoor', William Crossing writes there 'is a large block of granite on this pile [Easdon Tor] known as the Whooping Rock, and so called according to a note in Carrington's Dartmoor (poem, 1826) from the noise it made in tempestuous weather, presumably occasioned by the wind rushing through some aperture. But it has also been said to have obtained this name from a custom formerly observed in the locality of taking children to the tor when suffering from whooping-cough, in order that they might be near the sheep, a belief once existing that those afflicted with that complaint would be cured if left for a time among those animals'.

We've positioned 'Whooping Rock' on Google maps so zoom in on the 'Satellite' setting to see its location. Refer to our Easdon Tor listing for directions.